buy metformin online

MIT to Launch 'NFC App Inventor' to Ease Development of Apps for Android

Mar 28 2012 (All day)

While the number of NFC apps available in Google’s app store has grown substantially over the past several months, it isn’t easy for nonapp developers to create services for the expanding number of Android NFC phone models.

Next week the Center for Mobile Learning at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Mass., will introduce a Web-based service to enable a much broader range of smartphone users to more easily create apps for NFC-enabled Android phones.

UPDATE: The Center for Mobile Learning, along with its partners on the project, NXP Semiconductors, UPM RFID and digital advertising agency Isobar, will demonstrate an “NFC App Inventor” at the 3rd Annual Auto-ID-Sensing Solutions Expo to be held at the MIT Media Lab. NFC Cluster Boston, a group that promotes the development and marketability of NFC technology and part of the MIT Enterprise Forum, will be involved in the demo and expo. END UPDATE.

“App Inventor is intended to make it easy for kids and beginning programmers to create their own apps and explore the capabilities of smartphones,” said Hal Abelson, Professor of Computer Science and Engineering at MIT and a pioneer in mobile app development, in a statement.

Like the MIT App Inventor, which the university inherited from Android owner, Google, and which was developed there under Abelson during a sabbatical from MIT, the NFC App Inventor will be Internet-based. It is actually an NFC application-programming interface for the App Inventor. But it is still under development, and a beta version of the service will be demonstrated at the expo next week.

UPDATE: There are some limitations with the App Inventor for Android, according to David Wolber, professor of computer science at the University of San Francisco and co-author with Abelson and two others of the book, App Inventor: Create Your Own Android AppsFor example, there has been limited ability to build user interfaces for apps, which also do not have access to all the data and functionality of the Android phones on which they run. There is also limited access to the phone's contact list and to data from the Web.

But Stephen Miles, a researcher at MIT and co-founder of the NFC Cluster Boston, told NFC Times that about 80,000 developers and others have downloaded the App Inventor. And he said he believes the App Inventor and the NFC APIs for it have much greater significance than just the number of downloads–noting that such innovations as E Ink used in such e-books as the Amazon Kindle and the Guitar Hero music video game series originated in the MIT Media Lab. END UPDATE.   

Of course, with the NFC component of the App Inventor, would-be app developers will not be creating services for the Google Wallet. The wallet API is unpublished.

They would mainly be tag-reading apps, such as those for launching mobile Web sites and triggering content downloads or perhaps pairing of devices. And the apps will be intended for personal use, not to sell in the Google Play Store, formerly known as Android Market.

“You develop the app inside the Web browser and get a link to download it into your device,” Yuval Zukerman, vice president and director of mobile for Isobar, told NFC Times. “It’s enough to give you the functionality that you need.”

For example, users could use the NFC App Inventor to create a user interface and program tags for shopping lists. They could put tags on the wall associated with bread and milk and by tapping the tags, the app could remind them of what they need at the store.

While untrained users already program tags and perhaps create rudimentary apps on their phones, the NFC App Inventor is designed to take much less time to build the simple services, Zukerman said.

“You expand the reach of NFC into an even greater audience,” he said.

HEADLINE NEWS

Amid High-Profile Win with Apple, NXP Quietly Loses NFC Business for Samsung’s Galaxy Handsets

NFC Times Exclusive: While NXP Semiconductors won the coveted contract to supply NFC chips and secure elements to Apple for its new iPhone models, it has been cut out of the recent business for Samsung Galaxy handsets, including the Note 4.

NFC Booster Chip in New iPhones One Key to Apple Pay Performance, Though Not Yet Standardized

NFC Times Exclusive: In what is believed to be one of the first uses for NFC booster technology in NFC phones, the new iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus feature an amplifier chip enabling a unique antenna design by Apple for its Apple Pay service that launched Monday.

Japan’s NFC Device Rollout Tops 20 Million, Though Still Few Places for Consumers to Use Them

Japan’s rollout of phones and tablets supporting standard NFC technology has topped the 20 million mark, with Japan’s three major mobile operators deploying the handsets with NFC chips along with domestic FeliCa technology. But Japanese consumers still have few places to use the hybrid devices.

Apple to Launch Payments Service on Monday in U.S., Shuns Support for NFC in Tablets

Oct 17 2014 (All day)

Apple’s new tablets, the iPad Air 2 and iPad mini 3, unveiled today, will support the Touch ID fingerprint sensor to enable users to make purchases in apps with Apple Pay, but not in stores with NFC.

Despite NFC-Enabled iPhone and Watch, Hotels Appear to be Opting for BLE for Phone-Based Door Keys

NFC Times Exclusive: Several hotel chains are planning to start equipping certain properties with door locks supporting Bluetooth low energy by the early part of next year, or are seriously investigating the technology, which enables guests to enter their rooms with keys stored on their smartphones, Legic Identsystems, one of the technology vendors involved, told NFC Times.

China UnionPay Reportedly Strikes Deal with Samsung to Use Embedded Chips

Oct 9 2014 (All day)

Samsung Electronics reportedly says it has an agreement with payment network China UnionPay that would enable embedded chips in more than 3 million of its devices in China with China UnionPay’s contactless-payments service, though no banks have yet been mentioned as issuers.

NFC Forum Launches ‘Tap Into NFC’ Developer Program, Though Apple’s Platform Remains Closed

As the NFC Forum launches a new program to attract more application developers to the NFC ecosystem, the organization told NFC Times that it is encouraged by Apple’s adoption but considers it likely that the NFC developer community will focus on Android for the near future.

Taiwanese Telco Launches NFC; Implementation Issues with Mifare Limits Handset Models

Oct 2 2014 (All day)

TAIPEI, Taiwan – Taiwan’s largest telco, Chunghwa Telecom, Wednesday announced the launch of its long-planned NFC commercial service, enabling MasterCard PayPass credit cards from four banks, along with one of the first mobile NFC services supporting a Mifare transit purse, EasyCard.

Taiwan’s No. 1 Telco Prepares to Announce NFC Commercial Launch

Oct 1 2014 (All day)

Taiwan’s largest mobile operator, Chunghwa Telecom, will announce the small commercial launch of NFC service on Wednesday, with participation from MasterCard Worldwide, four major banks and the island nation’s largest transit and retail e-purse, EasyCard, NFC Times has learned.

People on the Move: Visa Europe’s Director of Mobile Joins Apple

Apple has hired Visa Europe’s director of mobile, Mary Carol Harris, as the tech giant gears up for its expected launch of Apple Pay in Europe later next year.

Makers of NFC Accessories Targeting iPhone Contend Their Market is Not Lost

NFC Times Exclusive: Despite the announcement by Apple of its first NFC-enabled iPhone, released Friday, promoters of NFC-enabled attachments targeting the iPhone contend they will not lose business.

NFC Forum Adds Long-Awaited Analog Testing to Its Device Certification Program

The NFC Forum has added the final major component to its device certification with the addition of analog testing, but the impact of the development on handset makers’ willingness to submit their devices for certification remains to be seen.